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6G72 Engine Rebuild Program

We are pleased to announce that we are offering our engine rebuild program to customers outside of our shop. Our engine rebuild program has only been offered to in house customers in the past, but we have streamlined the process to offer this service to our other customers.

Short Blocks: Our current offering for rebuilt 6G72 short blocks starts off with a thorough cleaning of the block to assess what needs to be done. The standard rebuild will consist of boring the block to the next acceptable size. New OEM style pistons are pressed onto the original connecting rods after the rods have been reconditioned. Reconditioning of the connecting rods ensures us that the big end of the rod is perfectly round and the small end will accept the piston wrist pin properly. The engine block machining process is done using an RMC CnC block center. The RMC block center probes the engine block’s cylinders and cylinder head mating surface to determine where to machine. This allows for perfectly straight cylinder walls every time. Here is a video demonstrating the process.

After the cylinders are bored to size, the RMC block center then resurfaces the cylinder head mating surface of the block to ensure a good seal for MLS head gaskets. This is essential, especially for early model cars that came with composite gaskets.

From there, the engine block moves over to the Sunnen SV10 to have the finish honing done to the cylinders. This machine creates the correct cross hatching, surface, and final sizing of the cylinders.

After the block is honed, it goes back into the jet wash machine for a final cleaning. All of the cylinders are measured again to make sure they are in spec. The main bearings are then installed into the block and we begin to measure the tolerances for the bearing to crankshaft clearances. This is very important. It allows us to choose the correct bearings to get the clearances within spec. The specifications for this varies depending on application. These clearances are important to know, as they will help you choose the correct engine oil to run in your completed engine assembly. We provide this information to you, so you can be well informed.

Once the crankshaft is properly fitted into the block, we test for thrust clearances. If the clearances are not ok, then there is either something wrong with the block or crankshaft. This is not something that can easily be remedied, so there are only a few options to choose from depending on which part has an issue.

If the thrust clearances check out ok, we move on to file fitting the piston rings. Just like bearing clearances, this specification will vary depending on application. When the rings are all fitted properly, we mount rod bearings into the connecting rods and measure both the connecting rod and crankshaft to calculate bearing clearances. This allows us to choose the correct bearing combination before installing the piston into the cylinder.

Finally, the piston and rod is assembled into the block and we rotate the assembly and check for any scoring of the cylinders (which would indicate an improper install of an oil retention ring).

Cylinder Heads: Our cylinder head rebuild starts off much like our engine block rebuild. They first get a trip through the jet wash machine. From there, they get fully disassembled and head over to the blasting cabinet to get looking brand new again. Another trip to the jet wash machine to clear out any remaining glass bead media. Then, they get resurfaced to ensure a proper seal with the head gasket. Finally, they go to the Serdi machine to have the valve seats cut and the valve guides checked. New guides are installed on any guide not meeting spec. New valves and valve stem seals are installed, along with the original valve springs. New valve springs can/will be used if the original valve springs do not meet the OEM specifications.

And these components can be offered in a pre-assembled long block assembly. This would include new MLS head gaskets and new cylinder head bolts and washers. We can also offer these long block assemblies loaded with cams, lifters, water pump, oil pump, and timing components. Even valve covers, oil pan, and turbos/manifolds if you wish.

All of these options are available on a core exchange basis. Check out our shop for pricing.

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Product Inventory

We have been working hard to create an experience for you that gives keeps you informed when you order parts through us. Our system here allows us to pull inventory totals from some of our warehouses (as well as our own inventory) and displays it on each product. This allows you to see what is available at the time of purchase. With how fast inventory can move (both from our warehouses and in store), these numbers can sometimes be inaccurate. If you see a low quantity on a product, and you need it quickly, you can reach out to us and have us check on availability. For items not in stock, we try to keep that product updated with estimated times of arrivals. If you see a product that is not in stock with no ETA, please reach out to us and we will give you the best idea possible on when you can expect that item to become available. There are times we can get that item shipped to you directly from the manufacturer if it is urgent enough (fee may apply).

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98 3000GT VR4 Build

This 98 3000GT VR4 came to us bone stock. The owner of the car wanted a solid 500 awhp car on pump gas. This was achieved through an efficient engine build. First, we started with our basic street version of our built short blocks. This includes Brian Crower forged connecting rods, Wiseco forged pistons, factory forged crankshaft, and some Clevite race bearings. To top off the engine, we utilized our ported head package that are done in a way to match the flow characteristics of the Brian Crower stage 2+ camshafts. With 1mm oversized valves on both intake and exhaust, upgraded valve spring set, and porting to make the most out of the efficiency range of the camshafts; we have put together a great pump gas engine that can easily support 500 awhp on pump gas.

With the engine assembly complete, we focus on what turbos to run. In order to get good power on the street, and keep within a budget, we use the Kinuagawa billet 19T HL turbo set. These will bolt on to stock manifolds with just some modifications to the front engine mount bracket. Fueling those turbos is a set of Evo 560cc fuel injectors and a Walbro E85 safe fuel pump (for future E85 usage with larger fuel injectors). The factory ecu in this particular model can be reprogrammed, so we just upgraded the factory intake/intercooler system with a GM MAF translator, Z06 Corvette MAF sensor, and a CX Racing side mount intercooler set and intake pipes. These upgrades allow for easier intake flow and more efficient cooling of the charged air from the turbos. To control the boost pressure, we added a MAC valve to the factory wiring harness and allowed the factory ecu to control boost. Having an engine management system control the boost is a great way to do so safely. Many have built in safety switches in case something goes wrong.

Final supporting modifications include a South Bend Stage 3 Endurance clutch kit, custom turbo back exhaust, Prothane engine mount bushings, Prothane front control arm bushings, poly rear differential bushings, Tein coilover system, Hawk brake pads, stainless brake lines, a transmission bell housing brace, and a front mounted oil cooler.

Our end result on the dyno was 470 awhp on 18 psi (due to hot temperatures). On the street, we were able to run 20 psi, which should put the car right around 500 awhp.